Getting creative with wreaths around Evanston

Holiday wreaths made from repurposed material

A holiday wreath adorns many homes and businesses in Evanston this time of year.  But the Evanston Rebuilding Warehouse has a question for you.

Can you make a wreath out of recycled materials? A number of residents took up the challenge and their efforts are on display at the Rebuilding Warehouse at 2101 Dempster St.

There are no pine cones or holly in sight. These wreaths are made from toilet seat covers, ties and jello molds among other things.

Rebuilding Warehouse Volunteer Coordinator Nancy Bennett says many of the items were provided free from the warehouse.


Nancy Bennett

“These are materials that were languishing in the warehouse.  We went through the place and picked out some items we thought would be fun to work with and we are thrilled with how people could take the same set of materials and come up with something completely different. "


Jody, Dylan, Kailyn and Brett May show off their wreaths.

The May family traveled from Zion to show off their efforts. Jody May says they spent a couple of days creating their wreaths. They used old bucket handles, salt and pepper shakers, newspaper, ties and yes a toilet seat cover.

"We really enjoy upcycling, stores like this we really enjoy and we saw there was a contest and it gives us an excuse to do something fun as a family"

These unique works of art will be on display at various businesses around Evanston throughout  December and you can vote for your favorite. The Rebuilding Warehouse asks you to go on their Instagram or Facebook page and “like” your favorite repurposed wreath.

The wreath with the most likes gets a $100 gift certificate and the runner-up a $50 gift certificate.

The rebuilding warehouse works to divert building materials from landfills to be re-used or repurposed locally.

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Comments

Hidden Gem

What a hidden gem on Evanston's Westside. Many people see this org as a place to find a vintage door knob, oak flooring, or a slightly used sink, but their positive hidden agenda is that they are a job training program teaching deconstruction skills to the marginalized. The fun wreaths will hopefully pull a few more people in to see what they do for our community.
 


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