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Evanston Township High School seniors Julia Crowley-Farenga and Patrick Loftus were named “Top Team” at the Siemens Science Competition Region Five Finals on November 12. Crowley-Farenga and Loftus will share a $6,000 scholarship for their Team category win.

Evanston Township High School seniors Julia Crowley-Farenga and Patrick Loftus were named “Top Team” at the Siemens Science Competition Region Five Finals on November 12. Crowley-Farenga and Loftus will share a $6,000 scholarship for their Team category win.

They examined and classified 2,811 galaxies as part of their astronomy project entitled Morphological Classification of Post-Starburst Galaxies.

The students presented their research to a panel of judges from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), host of the Region Five Finals. They are now invited to advance to the National Finals in Washington, DC, Dec. 2-5, where $500,000 in scholarships will be awarded, including two top prizes of $100,000.

According to ETHS physics teacher Mark Vondracek, the regional win is a first for Evanston Township High School. Dr. Vondracek explained: “ETHS has had many students make the National Finals for the Science Talent Search over a number of decades, but this is the first time we have had students make the National Finals for Siemens.”
 

Charles Bartling

A resident of Evanston since 1975, Chuck Bartling holds a master’s degree in journalism from Northwestern University and has extensive experience as a reporter and editor for daily newspapers, radio...

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2 Comments

  1. Congradulations !

    I only could wish ETHS and the other schools would point out the outstanding science and math students and teachers who helped them.

    Unfortunately the schools fail to make note of these and almost the only thing the community, other than the parents and maybe then only that which affects their kids, is the crime, fighting over how many schools are needed, low test scores, etc.. 

    More knowledge about the schools and stories like this will be important when residents are asked for support for the schools and esp. bond offerings.

    1. School boards

      Maybe the problem is that our school boards do not even acknowledge strengths, but focus only on deficits.

      We have great schools, but the school boards don't  have any vision on how to build upon those.  They only know how to react to the issue of the day.

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