Evanston police say they arrested or cited drivers for 75 violations during a two-week crackdown on traffic offenses last month funded by a state grant.

The campaign, centered around the St. Patrick’s Day holiday, ran from March 5 through March 21, and was target to reducing traffic accidents during the overnight hours.

Evanston police say they arrested or cited drivers for 75 violations during a two-week crackdown on traffic offenses last month funded by a state grant.

The campaign, centered around the St. Patrick’s Day holiday, ran from March 5 through March 21, and was target to reducing traffic accidents during the overnight hours.

Police say they made 25 stops for speeding, six for no proof of insurance, four for driving under the influence of alcohol, and two each for drug violations, seat belt violations and failure to carry a drivers license. The also made one arrest for driving on a suspended license and issued 33 other traffic citations for various offenses.

Officers say staying under the speed limit and wearing seat belts are a key combination for reducing traffic accidents and injuries.

The department plans other traffic enforcement campaigns centered around holidays during the year. 

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5 Comments

  1. Another money grab
    Three words. Blatant. Money. Grab.

    Do the greedy tentacles of this city know any bounds? No. They do not. And it’s infuriating.

    1. Pick a side!
      It seems strange to criticize the police for catching people not obeying the law. Isn’t that what we pay them for?

      If they DIDN’T catch people who were not obeying the law, people would be criticizing them for being just another waste of taxpayer dollars.

      Which do you want the police to do?

  2. How does that work?
    Police say they made 25 stops for speeding, six for no proof of insurance, four for driving under the influence of alcohol, and two each for drug violations, seat belt violations and failure to carry a drivers license.

    I understand how the police can stop drivers for speeding, driving under the influence, seat belt violations, and even visible drug violations, but …

    How do you stop someone for failure to carry a license? I understand how you cite them, but how can the police tell that someone is not carrying their license in a way that they can stop that person? Perhaps the city can get a state grant to write its press releases more clearly.

    1. Arrests for talking on the phone ?
      I’m waiting for the publication of who was caught talking on a hand-held phone or texting. They are at least as dangerous as DUIs !

      Next should be talking/texting while walking. Everyday I see NU students and even adults walk into traffic or where a pedestrian or biker [who is paying attention unlike them] is within feet of them or even has to yell at them before they know someone is coming the other way.
      Thiefs/muggers must have realized this my now and know they are easy victums.

  3. Why now?
    It IS what we pay them for. But, it’s about consistency or lack thereof. This effort was a two week “crackdown” funded by the state. So, they weren’t enforcing these laws before? And now they’re going to step up enforcement? Why now? It wouldn’t have anything to do with the fact that the state and the city have serious financial problems now would it? I don’t trust them.

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