Evanston Alderman Don Wilson, 4th Ward, says he is opposed to the idea of pensions for aldermen that was raised at Monday’s Human Services Committee meeting.

In a phone interview late this afternoon, Wilson, who is not a member of the committee, said he thinks it’s important for the city “to try to limit our penson obligations, not expand them.”

Evanston Alderman Don Wilson, 4th Ward, says he is opposed to the idea of pensions for aldermen that was raised at Monday’s Human Services Committee meeting.

In a phone interview late this afternoon, Wilson, who is not a member of the committee, said he thinks it’s important for the city “to try to limit our penson obligations, not expand them.”

He said that for city employees already covered by pension programs he’s in favor of moving from defined benefit to defined contribution, or 401(k) style, plans.

“But as far as aldermen go, their term is fairly short and I don’t think that a pension would be an appropriate enticement to get people to run,” Wilson said, adding, “I know they aren’t in it for the money, anyway.”

“Generally speaking I want to see less going out for pensions, not more,” he said.

The Human Services Committee discussion began with the issue of whether the aldermen should adopt a resolution that would entitle Township Assessor Bonnie Wilson, who is not related to Alderman Wilson, to a pension for her part-time elected job.

But the discussion quickly expanded to whether aldermen, who also serve part time, could also qualify for pension coverage under the Illinois Municipal Retirement Fund.

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Bill Smith is the editor and publisher of Evanston Now.

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2 Comments

  1. 401K plans not likely!

    401K plans are not likely to happen – why?

    A recent wall street Journal article about 401K for regular work stated the average value in a 401K was $140,000 – this would generate under $10,000 a year – only about 8% of all holders had enough to replace a $80,000 income. Thus 92% of all workers who have 401K in the private sector clearly do not have enough to retire.   Government workers – pensions appear quite different – 80% at 30 years of final salary – creates pension that would have 401K values of between 1 million to 1.5 million dollars.

    Looking at the fact you have 800 city employees – you could see a liability of well over $500 million dollars – ( police and fire pensions need $170 million , only 250 employees currently )

    The real city debt pension and the capital – might really  be close to ONE BILLION DOLLARS!  On the high side yes – but the Mayor guest NU speaker total us on pension were double – thus the police and fire alone would be $340 million.

    Give the city operation budget is only about $80 million and the city currently can't pay it – ( wait to March 22, ) you can see why we are in trouble.

  2. Part-Time Elected Officials-Pension?

    Are you excluding the Mayor and the Township Officials who are also part-time  like the Aldermen?

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