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Aldermen purr over new pet hoarding response plan

Evanston aldermen praised the city’s health staff this week for coming up with a new strategy for dealing with animal hoarding, after a plan to limit residents to four cats blew up over the summer.

“I think this is fabulous,” Alderman Judy Fiske, 1st Ward, said of the new plan — which brings together a team of city staff members from several departments to address hoarding complaints as they arise.

“Obviously there are many different strategies we can use, based on what’s already on the books, to address this problem,” Fiske added.

The plan, developed by Health Director Evonda Thomas and Division Manager Carl Caneva, brings together staff from the community development, police, fire and legal departments to respond to hoarding complaints.

It uses code provisions covering dangerous and unsafe buildings, nuisance premises, animal control and licensing, and cruelty to animals to handle the complaints.


Evanston aldermen praised the city’s health staff this week for coming up with a new strategy for dealing with animal hoarding, after a plan to limit residents to four cats blew up over the summer.

“I think this is fabulous,” Alderman Judy Fiske, 1st Ward, said of the new plan — which brings together a team of city staff members from several departments to address hoarding complaints as they arise.

“Obviously there are many different strategies we can use, based on what’s already on the books, to address this problem,” Fiske added.

The plan, developed by Health Director Evonda Thomas and Division Manager Carl Caneva, brings together staff from the community development, police, fire and legal departments to respond to hoarding complaints.

It uses code provisions covering dangerous and unsafe buildings, nuisance premises, animal control and licensing, and cruelty to animals to handle the complaints.

Thomas said team members will meet within 24 hours of receiving a complaint and decide which team member will take the lead in responding to the issue.

Alderman Jane Grover, 7th Ward, said, “This looks very good.’ She said the new strategy should make it possible for city workers to get into places where animal hoarding is taking place.

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Bill Smith

Bill Smith is the editor and publisher of Evanston Now.

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