Evanston aldermen tonight are scheduled to approve a new 22-month contract with the union representing sergeants in the police department. The deal contains raises totalling 3 percent during the first year.

The contract also lets the sergeants piggyback on the best percentage pay increase any of the city’s three other employee unions negotiate for the 2012 calendar year.

Evanston aldermen tonight are scheduled to approve a new 22-month contract with the union representing sergeants in the police department. The deal contains raises totalling 3 percent during the first year.

The contract also lets the sergeants piggyback on the best percentage pay increase any of the city’s three other employee unions negotiate for the 2012 calendar year.

Contracts with the other three unions expire at the end of this year.

For this year the pay raises are 2 percent retroactive to the start of the contract period March 1, with an additional 1 percent retroactive to May 1.

The contract also contains provisions to let any sergeant laid off during the contract term to return to the position of police officer at a pay rate within the police officer pay scale that is closest to the pay the officer was actually earning as a sergeant.

Bill Smith is the editor and publisher of Evanston Now.

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2 Comments

  1. The city is in the red and we give unions another pay raise

    Why did our aldermen negotiate a 3 percent annual pay raise to the sergeant union and lock it in for almost two years when the city has serious budget problems during the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression?

    To top it off, the sergeant union pay raise could increase even more if our aldermen negotiate even higher pay raises for the other government unions, which something tells me they will.

    Who in the private sector are getting raises? The state is deep in debt mainly because of the unsustainable government union pension, and here our aldermen STILL negotiate long-term contracts, giving these local unions annual pay raises. It's not enough our local taxes go up to to keep up with their rising pension costs.

    Even worse, these very same aldermen are exploring the option of getting a pension themselves. It appears they already approved a pension for the Township Assessor, Bonnie Wilson, but it seems no one really knows for sure.

    Take a look around town. Notice the vacant storefronts or the growing number of foreclosures? Gas prices are the highest in history and inflation has taken grip. Ask any lender and they will tell you there is a large supply of shadow foreclosures – bank owned homes that are purposefully kept off the market in order to not shock the market with a glut of foreclosures. Something like 30 percent of all Chicagoland homeowners are underwater. About 40 percent of all property sales in Illinois last year were distressed properties, foreclosures or short sales. This year it will be worse.

    Labor costs impact the budget the most. That should be the first place aldermen should look to cut. So guess what, places like the ecology center, the Chandler- Newberger Center and other areas of need are next to face the ax. And we will most likely see another city tax raise. 

    What can you expect when most if not all Evanston aldermen got campaign donations and support from these unions. It's clear to me now that our aldermen are more concerned about the unions that helped elect them than Evanston taxpayers.

    Aldermen should have immediately freeze pay raises and overtime pay of all city union employees LAST YEAR. And they should look for ways to cut personnel through privatizing services and partner services with neighboring towns.

     

  2. Mixed Message Wally

    I am a bit confused Wally has proposed next years budget at 1.5 million in the red, but one of his assumptions was no pay raises, he did mention step increases.  Of course he was vague and unclear on this when he spoke.  If he is planning on a 3% increase for everyone, his budget hole has grown by another   2 million dollars.

    It appears the budget hole is growing, not shrinking,  On top of this Wally idea of using operating funds to fund capital does not work – 2 million out of operation will translate to 20-25 employees being let go.

    Note six million dollar short fall is close to a 15% property tax increase!  On top of the fact Wally is mentioning, the budget year after that gets worst!

    Also other budget assumptions such as growth of the entire revenue of 2% are not likely to occur.

    In a year or two with this mess, continuing we could face huge tax increases or very large layoffs, the Mayor and council better start to realize they need to start exercise fiscal responsible leadership.

    By the way now of the above adds in the pension mess!

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