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‘Art Under Glass’ expands to Davis Street

Art Under Glass, the program that showcases Evanston artists in unoccupied storefront windows, expands this week to include six windows at 500 Davis St. downtown.

Art Under Glass, the program that showcases Evanston artists in unoccupied storefront windows, expands this week to include six windows at 500 Davis St. downtown.

Richard Similio, assistant property manager for Circle Realty Advisors, which manages the property, says that after seeing the exhibits installed at other locations downtown he was excited to offer space for the program.

A reception introducing the artists and their work will be held 5:15 p.m. Wednesday in the 500 Davis St. lobby.

Giordano’s, a tenant in the building, is providing refreshments for the reception. After Mayor Tisdahl and project coordinators welcome attendees, the artists will offer a short tour of the windows featuring their work. The tour will then continue to the 1600 block of Orrington, where three additional windows feature artists. Finally, the tour move on to the 1500 block of Maple Avenue to view works of a third group of artists.

Created last year by the Arts and Business Committee of the Evanston Arts Council, Art Under Glass is now in its fourth cycle, bringing life and energy to downtown Evanston streets by placing the work of local artists in empty retail spaces.

The first three cycles were a joint project of the committee, Downtown Evanston, and property manager Farnsworth-Hill, Inc.

The 500 Davis St. exhibit features art by Andrew Carsen, Leslie Hirschfield, Aparna Paul Jain, Sara Lettman, Martha Ruschman, and Alan Teller.

Artists displayed on Orrington Avenue are Kathryn Bradford, Sarah Kaiser and Eugenia Meltzer.

Jill King’s work and that of the Artists Seeds Organization are on Maple Avenue.

“We are pleased that some of the windows that had previously been filled with art have now been rented,” commented Jill Brazel, Chair of the Evanston Arts Council. “We hope that the attention the project has brought to the storefronts helped bring more business to Evanston.”

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