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City cuts mostly spare some units

The layoffs proposed by Evanston’s city manager — totalling 5.6 percent of the city’s workforce — will hit some departments very hard, but have little impact on others.

The changes involve reorganizations as well as layoffs. For this analysis, Evanston Now calculated what current staffing of 840 people would look like if the reorganization was already in effect, and we show the impact of the proposed elimination of 47 full-time-equivalent positions on that new structure.

We’ve also folded jobs assigned to several special funds into the general fund department that supervises them.

The Health and Human Services Department will face a major reorganization — losing the "Human Services" part of its title — with eight human services employees shifted to other city departments — parks, development and the city manager’s office.

Health will lose more than 20 percent of its remaining staff with the closure of the city’s dental clinic and end up with just 12.6 full-time-equivalent employees.

A completely new Administrative Services Department will be formed from the existing finance and human resources departments and the information technology unit now housed in the city manager’s office. More than 16 percent of the jobs in those units will be eliminated, with the deepest cuts coming in information technology.

The library will lose over 15 percent of its 67.5 FTE positions. The two branch libraries will close. Cataloging and some other functions at the main library will be outsourced. The outsourcing is expected to cut the net cost of those services roughly in half.

Three other units will see staff reductions close to the city-wide average.

The department now known as Parks, Forestry and Recreation will be renamed Parks, Recreation and Community Services. It will suffer a net loss of about 9 positions from its nearly 136 FTE positions, or a little under 7 percent.

Public Works will lose about 11 jobs from its staff of nearly 171, for a 6 percent reduction. This comes from reconfiguring the trash hauling service and making some cuts to fleet maintenance staffing.

Community Development will become Community and Economic Development, but lose two of its 40 positions for a 5 percent cut.

Almost unscathed by the changes are the Fire and Police Departments.

The police will lose four positions — three civilians and one retiring desk officer from a staff of 223, for a net reduction of less than 2 percent.

The Fire Department will lose just one of its 111 positions, for a cut of under 1 percent.

There’ll be no change in Law Department staffing, though it will pick up some additional work from other units.

The only unit showing a net gain is the City Manager’s office — with one vacant assistant city manager position eliminated, but three new positions added — a development officer, an intergovernmental relations coordinator and a one-year position for a local government management fellow.

The added positions include lobbying and economic development roles that aldermen have expressed an interest in beefing up.

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