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City plans to remove some parking meters

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It costs a lot of money to install and operate a parking meter, and some of Evanston's meters are just not collecting enough to keep them in operation, the City Council's Transportation and Parking Committee learned Wednesday night.

So they told Rickey Voss, the city's parking/fleet manager, that they agreed that the meters should be removed.

Monthly back office charges alone cost $7.25 per month per meter, Voss said, not to mention the original cost of $500 per unit and the cost of coin collection, repairs, and credit card charges.

His plan calls for removal of 46 meters in the following locations:

800 Main Street (Lot 8). Eight meters there generate an average of $1,032 over a three-month period. Voss recommends converting these spaces to Permit Parking.

1400 Elmwood Avenue. Six meters there generate an average of $1,195 every three months. These spaces, near the police headquarters, would be converted to Emergency Vehicle/2 hour parking.

3100 Central Street. These 11 meters generate a paltry $272 in revenue every three months. He would convert these spaces to free two-hour parking.

Elmwood Avenue and Dempster Street (Lot 23). These four metered spaces that generate an average of $287 in three months would be converted to Permit Parking.

Washington Street, between Chicago Avenue and Custer Avenue. These spaces, adjacent to the Main Street CTA and Metra stations, currently generate a three-month average of about $1,500 in revenue. Voss would convert these to Long Term Commuter Parking.

These long term meters on Washington Street, Voss said, would reduce the fee substantially from 75 cents per hour, with a two-hour maximum stay, to 25 cents per hour for up to 12 hours.

Located beneath the rail viaducts, the newly programmed Washington Street meters would allow "commuters and employees of area businesses to have access to reasonable parking," he said.

 

Charles Bartling

Charles Bartling

A resident of Evanston since 1975, Chuck Bartling holds a master’s degree in journalism from Northwestern University and has extensive experience as a reporter and editor for daily newspapers, radio stations and business-oriented magazines.

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