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The construction — or should we say demolition — fence is up behind the old Tom Thumb building on Davis Street.

And owner Dan Kelch says demolition work has begun to clear the site for a new incarnation of his LuLu’s and Taco Diablo restaurants.

Kelch shared on the LuLu’s Facebook page a rendering of the new building at 1026 Davis St. — which will house the two restaurants plus additional retail space on the first floor and have an outdoor rooftop deck for an event space on the second floor.

The former Taco Diablo site, across the street from the new one, was destroyed by fire in December 2013, not long after Kelch announced plans to close LuLu’s old location, which has since become the home to the new Boltwood restaurant.

The Tom Thumb hobby shop closed last year after 49 years on Evanston, and its owners moved the business to a smaller location closer to their home in Niles.

Bill Smith is the editor and publisher of Evanston Now.

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10 Comments

  1. Music Venue

    I guess I have been out of touch too long. I thought a music venue was proposed for this location. Did that fall by the wayside?

  2. Bravo Al Fresco Balcony

    Anyone who's enjoyed the second floor outdoor dining area at Sala Thai restaurant knows the fun of viewing the Dempster street scene below from an elevated perch. Now we can do the same on Davis St. The city should explore other buildings that could be adapted with elevated outdoor eating areas.

    1. Does anyone here cook any more?

      I agree. How many restaurants can Evanston sustain? It's pretty amazing we have so many already.

      1. Yes, but do they serve nightgowns?

        Ditto that, D.J. It does seem that every other new enterprise in Evanston is a restaurant when we already have a plethora of eateries.

        How odd that a city of Evanston's size no longer supports a major department store. When we moved here, there was a Marshall Fields in town & a Wieboldts as well. Of course one could buy a limited selection of clothes in the Gap (now that Ann Taylor Loft has left), but for a selection of nightgowns, for example, I have to go to Skokie or Chicago. Every trip to Old Orchard or to the Lincolnwood Town Center is tax money lost to Evanston. That's the same for what I buy online.

        People need food but they also require a clothing.

        And Evanston needs the tax money.

          1. Maybe we should have 5 or 10?

            As long as a business complies with ALL rules and regulations, it should be THEIR decision whether to open a second, third, fourth etc. location.

            On what basis does one community member or a group of people think they should determine if a private enterprise decides to expand? However, it's a different story if the company is coming to the City of Evanston and asks for a loan, subsidy or other financial inducement.

            TP

          2. It was an observation, not a determination

            So far as I can tell no one determined if a private enterprise decided to expand except for that private enterprise. The discussion is based on observations querying the wisdom of so doing. It's their call though.

    2. Restaurants

      Doesn't seem like it was an either/or.  As the article said, Tom Thumb left and is reopening in a smaller store in Niles clser to the owner's home.  I believe the people who run LuLu's and Taco Diablo are Evanstonians who are investing their money and hard work in the community with a wonderful payoff – two good restaurants.  I can't belive the complaining here.  If the Evanston, the surrounding towns and far north side of Chicago can support 1000 restaurants then I say bring them on.  It only increases the vitality of our town.  If they can't, then some of the restaurants will close.  Just like the department stores did years ago, driven out by the mall and big box stores.  

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