The Evanston/Skokie School District 65 board tonight will hold a public hearing and then adopt its budget for the school year that’s already underway.

The revised operating fund budget calls for spending $95.4 million, a six percent increase over last year.

It provides for hiring 12 new teachers and administrators and anticipates an increase in enrollment of 65 students.

About 75 percent of the district’s revenue comes from property taxes.

Details about the budget are available online. The meeting will be held at 7 p.m. at 1500 McDaniel Ave.

Related story

D65 budget plans for recovery

The Evanston/Skokie School District 65 board tonight will hold a public hearing and then adopt its budget for the school year that’s already underway.

The revised operating fund budget calls for spending $95.4 million, a six percent increase over last year.

It provides for hiring 12 new teachers and administrators and anticipates an increase in enrollment of 65 students.

About 75 percent of the district’s revenue comes from property taxes.

Details about the budget are available online. The meeting will be held at 7 p.m. at 1500 McDaniel Ave.

Related story

D65 budget plans for recovery

Bill Smith is the editor and publisher of Evanston Now.

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2 Comments

  1. Student Increase
    As a home owner living across the street from Oakton Elementary School, I have taken note of the cars dropping students off in the morning. With an average of eighty to ninety cars between 8:15 and 9:00am only about twenty actually have Evanston City stickers, the others all have Chicago stickers or none at all.

    Having gone through the Evanston school system myself, I was always perplexed how many of my classmates actually lived in Chicago and laughed about how their parents used a relative or friend’s mailing address get into district 65.

    I’m sure the actual numbers of fraudulent students is horrifying and placing a huge burden on the school system.

    How is Evanston/D65 addressing these students and their parents?

  2. D65’s “residency requirement” — just tell them “really”
    On your question about out-of-district students attending D65 schools:

    “How is Evanston/D65 addressing these students and their parents?”

    Here’s what happens and it is inadequate:

    Before every school year, D65 parents must present to the D65 administrators written proof that we live here. As I recall, you need your property tax bill or mortgage payment coupon or your rental agreement AND two other pieces of proof, such as telephone, electricity or natural gas bills. They must be current bills.

    I’m giving examples only. The list of what’s accepted as written proof of residency is pretty long so no one who actually lives here shouldn’t have something. (Homeless children fall into a separate category but I’ll address that issue at the end of the posting.)

    But here’s the loophole: D65 will accept an affidavit of residency. The affidavit basically says “I really, really, really, really live in Evanston. Really.”

    The loophole? No one at D65 checks any of these affidavits. And the number of affidavits has skyrocketed in the last two years as D65 touted that it was “cracking down” on the residency requirement. (No numbers made available for this school year yet.)

    It doesn’t take a genius to conclude that these affidavits are being misused to allow many children who don’t live in D65 to attend school here. And at about $12,000 per student education costs, just 60 extra students district wide costs D65 taxpayers $720,000 every year. With 15 elementary, magnet and middle schools, just four non-D65 students at each school gets us to 60 students.

    Homeless children are in a separate category and, sadly, their numbers are increasing. It is true that their parents or guardians will typically not have the required documentation. The system needs to accept such situations but, as with all other affidavits of residency, D65 at least needs to spot check them.

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