The Evanston Township High School board has voted 6-1 to extend Superintendent Eric Witherspoon contract two more years, through June 2015.

The board also voted last week to raise Witherspoon’s base salary by 2 percent, to $224,518, for the year that starts July 1, provide an additional $44,900 in a tax-deferred annuity and contribute $23,000 for him to the sate teacher’s retirement system.

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4 Comments

  1. With Gifts like this will we be able to afford schools

     Most employees [and more and more in management] in private firms are given one year contracts at most—most "at the will of management."   However the Board seems to assure the school members they will be taken care of.  Kind of takes away the impetus for doing well and making necessary changes.

      Makes you wonder why the Board feels they have to make sure the officials have their rewards well into the future.  Some day maybe we will find out their real motives—certainly not accountable education.

  2. Not bad Eric

    That’s at least 5 teachers NOT hired to fill a redundant job that might was well have a job title of "Superintendant In Charge of Looking Out The WIndow".

     

    Meanwhile, the taxpayers of Evanston get more fees added to every city service, parents have to pay more & more fees to a diminishing-quality school, teachers being terminated or forced into early retirement, classrooms becomming overcrowded… and the spend-thrifts on the board give out 2% increases, an almost 25% TAX-DEFFERED annuity, and almost 10% in EXTRA contribution to an already greedily bloated retirement system.

    Here’s an idea- how about paying your own damn retirement with that quarter-mil salary. Better yet, how about taking a 50% paycut and putting back a couple of teachers.

    Doesn’t anyone get tired of this unchecked greed and spending?

  3. Market value of superintendents’ salaries

     I am not in favor of public pensions and government bailouts and handouts in the least.  Personally, these are the reasons that Illinios after California will be soon be bankrupted.

    In extending Dr. Witherspoon the terms of the contract extension laid out in the above,  D202 Board is simply compensating Dr. Witherspoon the market value of a typical superintendent’s salary in the Chicago area.  If you compare the salaries and compensations of  superintendents along the northshore,   suburbs next to the lake like Glenview and Northfield, and other suburbs next to Chicago, their salaries range anywhere from $175,000 to $400,000 with a lot of bonuses.   D202 Board is not overpaying Witherspoon or giving him a gift but paying him a competitive salary and bonus.

    If you don’t like how much D202 is paying Witherspoon, the reform should really begin with the state lawmakers in Springfield.

    Likewise, the public complains about large companies who have been bailed out by the government who pay their CEO’s in the millions per year.  But the market value of CEO’s for certain large companies is in the millions.  If a large company who has been bailed out by the government is not willing to pay the market price for a CEO who can turn their company around, they will only get an incompetent CEO who will never fix the company’s problems.  

    Our taxes, whether used to pay a  superintendent or CEO to resuscitate a large  failing company,  is not wasted if they are paying competent leaders of these institutions the fair market values of their positions.

  4. Worth the pay ? Really ?

      Both school and corporate officials are given packages by 1. other officers who hope boosting pay of the higher-ups will also cause their pay to increase  2. companies wanting to convey that they have the ‘best’ CEO [substitute the title you want]  since they pay them so much—"our CEO is above average" just like all the students in Lake Woebeong are above average 3. consultants that know if they recommend less than the CEO wants, they won’t get the contract next year.

      Look what happens when someone is hired.  You hear "greatest CEO ever", "he will turn the company around", "he will prove we are the best", etc..  When he fails the next CEO will be brought in with the same phrases but the company/school will say "all our problems were caused by the last CEO—we should never have hired him;  this CEO is the best thing since sliced bread", etc..

      Of course the company/school will reward the CEO/superintent for any improvement or give a retention bonus if things fail so he will stay and fix the problem [he caused].  Of course the CEO will get all the credit when things go could [the employees did nothing to deserve a bonus] but will escape blame [and get a bonus] when things go bad because it was "all the fault of the employees."

      Except in hindsight, the CEO/superintent is the luck of the draw.  You don’t know for years if they were really sucessful or lucky or if any improvement was from the employees.  The CEO will get credit as long as he is there—until he is fired. 

     

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