Evanston fire officials are reminding residents that the sale, use, or possession of all fireworks, including sparklers, is illegal in Evanston.

Division Chief Tom Janetske and Captain Geoff Block show fireworks confiscated Monday.

Evanston fire officials are reminding residents that the sale, use, or possession of all fireworks, including sparklers, is illegal in Evanston.

Division Chief Tom Janetske and Captain Geoff Block show fireworks confiscated Monday.

Fire investigators Monday confiscated nearly 100 pounds of illegal fireworks from local retailers. The store owners were issued citations. The illegal materials will be taken to a secure location and destroyed by technicians.

Investigators will continue to survey retailers and investigate any who may be selling illegal fireworks.

The National Fire Protection Association reported last year over 9,800 injuries and 32,000 fires occurred from the use of fireworks. Of these incidents, 75 percent occurred between June 23 and July 23. Despite the dangers of fireworks, many people don’t understand the risks. Sparklers alone can burn at up to 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

The Fire Department urges parents to educate children about the dangers of fireworks and encourages people who want to see a fireworks display to view the professional fireworks show on July 4th at the Evanston lakefront.

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3 Comments

  1. They are not dangerous.

    Saying fireworks are dangerous is like saying guns are dangerous. They are not dangerous. The people using them are dangerous.

    And those numbers they throw out there mean nothing. How many people had no injuries last year from fireworks? I am guessing a lot more than those that did get injured.

    I am embarrassed at how easily people are scared. Learn how to use something before you ban it.

    Next thing they will say that Alcohol is too dangerous and make that illegal also.

    1. Silly comparison of guns and fireworks

      Anonymous says: "Saying fireworks are dangerous is like saying guns are dangerous. They are not dangerous. The people using them are dangerous." This sort of Second Amendement analogy does not the scrutiny of enquiring minds. At best, this comparison would be an argument to legalize the sale and possession of fireworks within city limits. But it is irresponsible, and illegal, to just go around shooting guns in the air within the city limits. Even the NRA doesn’t advocate that. If you want to set off fireworks within a controlled environment (like inside your house), I would have no problem with that.

  2. Population density makes things different here

    Where I went to high school, in Northern Kentucky, most of these fireworks were legal, but the average lot size was over two acres.  Somebody being irresponsible with fireworks was unlikely to harm anyone but himself and his own family, and were far enough away that the noise wasn’t really disturbing.

    Not so in my neighborhood.  I’ve had firecrackers thrown at myself and preschoolers in the park, shot off underneath my window late at night, have seen kids throwing them at each other, into crowds, and under cars (I assume in hopes of igniting leaking fluids)  Irresponsible behavior?  Yes, but it’s so prevalent, why take the risk?   In a densely-populated area, amateur fireworks just don’t make sense – especially when we have so many options for beautiful, professional fireworks.

    Please pay attention to the Fire Department, and report sellers of illegal fireworks to police.

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