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Five at NU get science awards

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Five young Northwestern University faculty members — Oliver Cossairt, Kate Juschenko, James Rondinelli, Evan Scott and Keith Tyo — have received a prestigious Faculty Early Career Development Award from the National Science Foundation.

The CAREER award, the NSF’s most prestigious honor for junior faculty members, supports early career development of individuals who exemplify the role of teacher-scholar through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research. The minimum CAREER award size is $400,000 for a five-year period.

The award recipients’ areas of research include computational photography, modulation of the immune system, computational design of new materials, engineering microbes for biofuels, chemicals and drugs, and functional analysis in mathematics.

Juschenko, assistant professor of mathematics in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences, will work to produce several examples of “amenable groups” and extend the technique that recently has been applied to larger settings.

Cossairt, assistant professor of electrical engineering and computer science in the McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science, wants to build a digital camera with the same resolution as an optical telescope using only commercially available camera modules and inexpensive optical components.

Rondinelli, assistant professor of materials science and engineering at McCormick, aims to design electronic properties of materials, including electrical resistivity and optical behavior, by controlling material structure at the level of atoms.

Scott, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at McCormick is engineering synthetic nanostructures that mimic viruses, which will serve as tools to study inflammation resulting from viral infection.

Tyo, assistant professor of chemical and biological engineering at McCormick, will investigate metabolic regulation in non-growing bacteria to better engineer highly productive microbe strains for fuel synthesis.

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