The Evanston Community Foundation’s Leadership Evanston program is again offering Encore Senior Leadership, a ten-week program for semi-retired or retired residents looking for new ways to be involved in the community.

The class runs from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Wednesdays, from April 14 through June 16.

The Evanston Community Foundation’s Leadership Evanston program is again offering Encore Senior Leadership, a ten-week program for semi-retired or retired residents looking for new ways to be involved in the community.

The class runs from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Wednesdays, from April 14 through June 16.

Designed to give local residents a broader and deeper knowledge of the community and its issues, Encore Senior Leadership begins with a look back at Evanston’s history including a historical tour of Evanston neighborhoods highlighting major trends of yesterday and today.

Over the ten-week program, participants interact with panels of community leaders to discuss current issues, participate in skill development exercises in such fields as citizen advocacy, board service and successful aging as well as work on a group project.

By the end of the program, participants will have a richer perspective on their community and the skills to make a difference. Graduates have connected to new opportunities, from community activism and advocacy to tutoring to serving on nonprofit and city boards and commissions.

Three Crowns Park, the independent Evanston not-for-profit senior community, is sponsoring Encore Senior Leadership for the next three years. The support of Three Crowns Park makes it possible to keep tuition at $350, which includes lunch for the sessions, and to offer scholarships to those who may need financial assistance in order to participate.

If you’re interested in joining this year’s Encore Senior Leadership class, apply online or call Beth Osterlund 847.492-0992 for more information. 

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7 Comments

  1. Seniors and teaching
    It would be great if seniors, many with PhDs, would be allowed to teach in the public schools but the unions have pretty much locked everyone out unless they jump through all the union and useless teacher course hoops.
    With the need to bring many students up to grade level, be able to supplement classes, need for tutors and advanced courses/tutoring for gifted students, not to mention the bloated school budget, it would be great to have not only seniors but other highly educated residents added—but alas that won’t happen because of unions and criteria meant to keep people out.

    1. There’s no stopping volunteers!
      I have often thought that we should seek a partnership between our schools and our seniors: I think it would be a mutually beneficial relationship. There’s no reason why seniors can’t volunteer in the schools, and volunteers have no reason to join a union. Any PTA will offer you dozens of ways where you can become a valued asset right in your own neighborhood, including tutoring and support programs, edible gardens and school beautification, grantwriting and fundraising support – the list goes on and on.

      You can contact your local school’s PTA through the District 65 website.

  2. Unions?
    The teachers unions have very little to do with setting the state requirements for new teachers. Talk to your state government officials in Springfield. They are the ones who require licenses and fees for all sorts of professions. The teachers’ unions don’t choose who become members. Once teachers are hired by the school district, they are admitted to the union. You can accuse the unions of helping to protect teachers (good and bad), but not of keeping potential candidates out of teaching.

    1. School Unions get the legislators to write rules they want
      Who do you think forces the state to impose testing/certification rules and as I understand union membership on anyone who wants to teach.
      Just as plumbers, carpenter, etc. unions try to keep their ranks [number, race, etc.] protected, the unions through financial payments to legislators and threat that they won’t back candidates that don’t do their bidding, they get the rules set to what they want.
      Their vested interest is to keep people out—esp. those who know their subject and would show them up.

  3. Can I teach in a public school without joining a union?
    What if a school district hired me but I refused to join the union? Am I required to join a union in order to teach in D65 or 202? I’m not positive but I think the answer is yes.

    1. No
      It’s my understanding (public school teacher 16 years) that no you don’t have to join a union, but you will have to pay dues. I believe (but might be wrong) that you also will fall under union bargaining anyway when it comes to negotiation and contract obligations.

  4. What does ETHS teach ?
    Ever notice that the Web site does not detail even the courses the students can take ?
    E.g. math/science electives at or beyond the AP level. Or if they can do independent study in advance subjects with ETHS teachers or classes at or by NU professors.

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