Several home construction and restoration projects have received awards from the Evanston Preservation Commission.

The annual awards, presented by Mayor Elizabeth Tisdahl at last week’s City Council meeting, were selected by a panel of local judges experienced in preservation, architecture, urban design, planning and architectural history.

Several home construction and restoration projects have received awards from the Evanston Preservation Commission.

The annual awards, presented by Mayor Elizabeth Tisdahl at last week’s City Council meeting, were selected by a panel of local judges experienced in preservation, architecture, urban design, planning and architectural history.

Proper Rehabilitation/Restoration

A project that has closely followed the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for The Treatment of Historic Properties and its Guidelines for Preserving, Rehabilitating, Restoring and Reconstructing Buildings (landmarks and non-landmark contributing/significant buildings city wide are eligible).

1046 Sheridan Road

This year’s winner is the property at 1046 Sheridan Rd. It is owned by Janet Kohl who was also the contractor. Located in the Lakeshore Historic District, this large single family home had been deemed uninhabitable at purchase in 1998 (in fact it was the neighborhood haunted house). The property underwent a complete restoration, from the replacement of the sewage lines to restoration of original door hardware. The work discreetly incorporates modern amenities while retaining all period features. All work was done to the Secretary of the Interior’s guidelines for historic properties. Jury Comments: “a subtle and impeccable restoration of a stately landmark.”

Sensitive Addition/Alteration

A project that successfully integrated an addition/alteration within the architectural style of a main house or building and complements the context and character of a historic district, neighborhood or specific area. There were three winners in this category one of which one received the Margery B. Perkins Award.

Mason Park, 1600 Church St. 

The first winner in this category and winner of the Margery B. Perkins Award as the most outstanding project in any category this year was the property at 1600 Church Street, Mason Park. It is owned by the City of Evanston; the architect was Elliot Dudnik and Associates; and the contractor was JP Bruno Corporation.

This project comprised the development of a master plan for all of Mason Park. Designed with input from the community, the result is a structured series of recreational spaces of different types and a field house which is now the focal point of the park. Jury Comments: This project has a terrific breakdown of scale and a wonderful variety of spaces to suit a range of differing needs. It is a wonderful example of successful place-making.” The Commission’s highest accolade was given to this property as they felt it contributed significantly to the quality of the public realm and to the identity of the surrounding area.

1419 Judson Ave. before …

… and after restoration.

The second winner was the property at 1419 Judson. It is owned by Fred and Kim Rafilson and the architect and contractor was Benevenuti & Stein. A one-story family room addition, including a deck and a two-story tower element has been added to the rear of this house. Aluminum siding and storm windows were removed to allow for a painted wood exterior. Asphalt roofing was removed and replaced with cedar shingles. Jury Comment: “a thoughtful addition with exquisite detail and craftsmanship.”

1024 Judson Ave.

The final winner in this category was the property located at 1024 Judson Ave. It is owned by Mark Ouweleen and Sarah Harding; the architect was Tom Bassett-Dilley; and the contractor was Sturm Builders. The program for this project was to adapt the existing garage and unfinished attic into a functioning garage with separate side entry and guest suite above. Design includes well-scaled landscaped space in the backyard with a path and a masonry site wall which visually links the main and coach houses. Jury Comments: “a seemless merging of the old and new with lovely attention to detail.”

Appropriate New Construction

A new house, building or structure that through its design and use of building materials enhances the quality of the built environment. The project must have a positive impact on its immediate surroundings, including historic district, neighborhood or specific area. There was one winner in this area which received the Commission’s highest accolade, the Margery Perkins Award, for its contribution the quality of the public realm and to the identity of the surrounding area.

1801 Wesley Ave.

The winner in this area was the property at 1801 Wesley Ave. It is owned by Richard and Elaine Heuberger; the architect was Paul Audrain; and the contractor was Rock and Wall Construction. This new construction of a single family home was on a vacant corner lot in the Ridge Historic District. Jury Comments: “This is a striking contemporary design, sensitive to its context in form, scale and massing, with a particularly successful interface between public and private realms. This project illustrates that good, contemporary design can sit comfortably in an historic district.”

This year’s Jurors were Jack Weiss, of Jack Weiss and Associates Design and President of Design Evanston; Leonard Koroski, of Goettsch Partners Architects; and Amy Riseborough, associate member of the Preservation Commission.

Related links

Slide show of homes and the award ceremony

Preservation and Design Awards presentation (.pdf)

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4 Comments

  1. Do these annual awards result

    Do these annual awards result in the brass oval plaques that I have seen on homes, indicating the place is a historic home along with a number or is that a separate program? A couple of years ago I enquired if there is an online (or any) listing of these "plaque" places with a description of what makes them notable. The answer was there is no online listing and the listing that exists gives the address and year built with no other information.

    It would be wonderful to know the historic significance of the plaque homes beyond the usually obvious fact that they are old.

    1. Plaques on landmark houses

      The plaques that you see on landmark homes are purchased by the owners, previously available through the History Center, now through the Preservation Commission.  They were about $200 and are cast bronze. We are looking for suppliers who may charge less. EAch one is individually numbered.

      The homes are generally landmarked for more than age: architectural or historical significance are two of the categories. If you check the National Register of Historic Places you can find the standards that Evanston adopted as part of its ordinance.

      For more information, contact Carlos Ruiz, Preservation Coordinator, City of Evanston, 847-448-8687. He is very knowledgeable and willing to help.

      Emily Guthrie, Vice Chair, Preservation Commission

      1. historic plaques

        Emily, thanks for the information. I called Mr. Ruiz and he explained the plaque program, that it is no longer running and that the historical society might have info on the homes that have plaques.  I believe he said about 800 homes had received plaques and that it was a fundraising effort for the Historical Society. I called the Historical Society and they confirmed that if anyone wants further information about any home that has a plaque, they can come in and get it from the society’s files.

        So, my question is answered.

         

         

         

  2. 1801 Wesley

    Sorry, but the house is hideous. No architectural interest whatsoever. "striking contemporary design"? Please!

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