Evanston officials and residents plan to meet Thursday evening with representatives from the owners of the garbage transfer station on Church Street  to try to reach an agreement about the facility’s operations. 

Evanston officials and residents plan to meet Thursday evening with representatives from the owners of the garbage transfer station on Church Street  to try to reach an agreement about the facility’s operations. 

Recently constructed townhouses overlook the transfer station.

The station, owned by Veolia Environmental Services, has been the subject of frequent complaints by nearby residents who say an odor of garbage often permeates the largely residential neighborhood around the site.

The facility is licensed by the state Environmental Protection Agency, and has generally passed annual inspections by that agency.

Ashley McIlwee of the city’s health department says the concept of a “host community agreement” has been used in recent years by other Illinois communities that are the site of transfer stations, including Glenview, Plano and West Chicago.

She said the decision to sign an agreement would be voluntary by the company, but that once it was adopted, the city could enforce the standards that had been agreed to.

Muffy McAuley, a neighboring property owner who has been among those complaining about the transfer station’s operation, says that in addition to foul odors garbage trucks using the site cause vibration damage to nearby homes and create dangerous traffic conditions for children using Mason Park across Church Street from the transfer station and for students travelling to and from nearby Evanston Township High School.

The transfer station, under various owners, has been at the site since at least 1984.

The meeting will be held at 6 p.m. in Room 2200 of the Civic Center, 2100 Ridge Ave.

Bill Smith is the editor and publisher of Evanston Now.

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3 Comments

  1. Hello people you moved next

    Hello people you moved next to a garbage dump! Not to mention it’s been there over 20 years before those buildings were built!

    1. Time for a change

      So the dump is over 20 years old but most of the surrounding neighborhood is over 50 years old.  Plus the transfer station is a relatively new operation. I believe the first business was transfer area for leaves and then a storage area for trucks. The transfer station as we know it gradually turned into the operation that it is today.  I don’t think anyone at the beginning would have wanted what it is today. 

      The first poster is correct. I’ve lived in the area for years and I haven’t heard of any traffic incidents with the trucks. Perhaps wear and tear on the street should be a concern.  Vibration damage? Most likely caused by normal settling of a home. That one would be hard to prove it came from the station.

       

  2. Have there been any incidents

    Have there been any incidents involving the trucks and people using Mason Park in the past 25 years?

    Has there ever been an incident involving an ETHS student and a Veolia truck over the past 25 years?

    What ‘vibration damage’ has been caused as a result of the company’s trucks?  And, if any damage exists, how can anyone attribute it to the trucks and not to workmanship issues on the new construction?

    This is so typically Evanston– just cite a litany of ‘problems’ without any evidence to support them, repeat as necessary, and hope that eventually someone will believe them.

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