Want to know what the county assessor thinks your home is worth?

You don’t have to wait for the notice to show up in the mail later this week. You can find the answer this morning by typing in your address on the county assessor’s website

Want to know what the county assessor thinks your home is worth?

You don’t have to wait for the notice to show up in the mail later this week. You can find the answer this morning by typing in your address on the county assessor’s website

The assessor’s office says Evanston single-family detached home property values have declined on average by 12 percent this year — but assessments for individual homes may vary widely from that average.

The value of condominiums declined just one percent.

The website report for your house will show its new value for 2010, along with its old value from 2009. Do a little math and you can calculate the percentage change. The assessed values shown are supposed to represent 10 percent of the actual value of the home.

A decline in assessments doesn’t necessarily mean your tax bill will decline — because government units don’t set their spending levels based on tax assessments.

But assuming all taxing units held their spending steady, and assuming your assessment declined by the city-wide average amount — you might expect to see no change in your tax bill.

If your assessment declined by substantially more than the average, you could expect to see some reduction in next year’s tax bill.

But don’t go spend that money just yet.

And, if you think the assessor overestimated the value of your home, you can file an appeal on the assessor’s website.

Bill Smith is the editor and publisher of Evanston Now.

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2 Comments

  1. Assessor’s Methods

    O.k. no one understands how the Assessor comes up with many of the assessed valuations but this one stumps me.
    Two properties [2B condos] on east Central very close to each other that the County Assessor lists as being ‘comparable.’
    One did not have its assessed value changed [despite stories that in general they dropped 12%] from 2009 to 2010 and is for sale at $190,000 with an assessed valuation of $19,200 [using the Assessors formula of 10 times assessed valuation it is listed as Market Value of $192,000] and remains unsold.
    The other 2B has larger rooms, a garage and is on the market for $299,000. Yet from 2009 to 2010 its assessed valuation dropped from $31,000 to $13,000.
    Very odd the workings of the Assessors office.
    In this day and age you would think the Township assessor would have email so that people could leave questions, like this one, in preparation for submitting an appeal. Rather than playing phone-tag [they say don’t ‘drop-in.’ It would seem to help get a lot of questions answered when they had time to research—not when you finally get an appointment and they have to dig through evidence—and when the question is not a complete appeal.
  2. Guilty until proven innocent

      The Assessor’s assessment valuations are much like the IRS—guilty until proven innocent.

       Here the County assumes what the property is worth, gives you 30 days to appeal and prove them wrong ["don’t need a lawyer", yeah  right !] and then taxes you at their ‘guess’ for which they gave you no evidence—just look at properties around you or those you know well.

       It is like the IRS telling you how much you made last year and then you have to prove them wrong.  The IRS can confiscate your property not only for taxes but ‘crimes’ they want to accues you of.  Fortantely the Assessor does not have that power yet—-at least a number of months and a number of penalties slow them down before they take the property.

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