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Pajamas at the plaza

The City Council Monday gave preliminary approval to plans for Cereality, a carryout restaurant in the new Sherman Plaza development that features employees in pajamas serving breakfast cereal all day long.

The City Council Monday gave preliminary approval to plans for Cereality, a carryout restaurant in the new Sherman Plaza development that features employees in pajamas serving breakfast cereal all day long.

The restaurant will be located at 1622 Sherman Avenue, between the entrance to the parking garage and the Barnes & Noble store.

Noting that the Cereality concept does not involve grilled or fried food, the aldermen voted to exclude those cooking techniques from the special use permit for the restaurant, as a way of preventing it from being converted to a Burger King or McDonalds without city approval in the future.

The restaurant would be the fourth Cereality shop in the country. One is already located in downtown Chicago.

Housing help for disabled

Aldermen approved $98,000 in grants from the city’s affordable housing funds to assist seven low income, physically or developmentally disabled persons with down payments for accessible condominium units at the Sienna Development at Oak Avenue and Clark Street.

The approval came after the aldermen increased from five to 15 years the period during which a sale of a unit to a non-disabled person would trigger a requirement to pay back the money.

Homegrown artists
The City Council approved plans by the Evanston Arts Council to conduct a pilot program inviting Evanston artists to bring their artwork to the Evanston Farmers Market on three weekends this fall starting Sept. 23.

The program would be limited to Evanston residents displaying works they make themselves. It’s designed to enable new artists to test their wares without making a big financial commitment.

Bee debate buzzes along
Aldermen Monday again debated the merits of banning or restricting beekeeping in the city.
They learned that Cook County may already have legislation restricting beekeeping and directed the city’s legal staff to determine whether those restrictions would meet Evanstons needs, and if not, to develop the city’s own set of proposed rules.

Most aldermen appeared to oppose a complete ban on the hobby, and public testimony on the issue continued to be sharply split about the need for regulation.

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