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Prospect of new life for old stations topped the news

Schools, housing and crime were also hot topics.

Commuters wait for a train at the Davis Street station.

The potential redevelopment of Evanston’s commuter rail stations was last month’s most read story on Evanston Now.

Here’s a rundown of the top 10:

  1. Railroad hopes to sell Evanston stations — Oct 16 — Union Pacific Railroad is hoping to sell more than 40 suburban stations and associated properties in Chicagoland, including the three stops in Evanston, for potential development.
  2. D65: School closings, staff cuts likely — Oct. 12 — But board members also want to build a new 5th Ward school.
  3. Council approves 116 new apartments on Chicago Avenue — Oct. 13 — Project includes 10 affordable housing units on site.
  4. Worried neighbors learn of carjacking arrest — Oct. 20 — Arrest came as the area recorded its third and fourth carjackings of the month. (The first two had occurred less than 24 hours apart.)
  5. Chief: Police are ‘stressed out and exhausted’ — Oct. 19 — Force has lost 19 officers and violent crime has increased 47% so far this year. The first two happened on two successive days.
  6. Cops: Man charged after pointing laser sight at plane from beach — Oct. 3 — Police say he also pointed the laser, mounted to a handgun, at a police officer responding to the incident at Clark Street Beach.
  7. Former ETHS band coach charged with child seduction — Oct. 16 — Case involves a 16-year-old student at an Indiana school where he also taught.
  8. Man’s body found near South Boulevard Beach — Oct. 24 — The victim was later identified as a Northwestern University grad student.
  9. Reid calls for middle-class tax hikes — Oct. 20 — Wants to tax leases on market-rate rental properties and raise fees for having multiple cars. (A week later the alder said he’d misspoken in describing the level at which he wanted to apply his proposed tax on rental leases.)
  10. Teachers protest ‘toxic work environment’ at District 65 — Oct. 11 — Union head claims “power hungry administrators” are sticking teachers with “with unnecessary and cumbersome tasks” and says fights among students “are escalating and getting out of control.”

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