mic-ribbon-cuttingimg_1721

Evanston’s official ribbon-cutting scissors will really get a workout this week.

Tania Merlos-Ruiz’s Tomate Fresh Kitchen, which opened last month at 914-1/2 Noyes St. offering gourmet street food for lunch and dinner, gets a visit from the mayor and other officials bearing the scissors at 2 p.m. on Wednesday.

Cornerstone Health, a new chiropractic clinic at 500 Davis St., gets a similar visit at 5 p.m. Wednesday.

The new net-zero, energy-efficient Walgreens drug store at Chicago Avenue and Keeney Street opens at 10 a.m. on Thursday, Nov. 21.

And then at 5 p.m. Thursday, the scissors will appear at the extensively renovated Group Fox Presidential Apartments a couple blocks away at 800 Hinman Ave.

The public is welcome to attend these events, and there’ll generally be snacks or free samples on offer.

Bill Smith is the editor and publisher of Evanston Now.

Join the Conversation

3 Comments

  1. Near Net-Zero

    It is my understanding that the new Walgreens will be rated as near net-zero energy rated. Based on an official from Walgreens, they are hoping for 70 – 80 percent of their energy use to be supplied through the solar cell array. They will not know for sure until a year has passed.

    1. Net-zero, they say

      Company news release regarding the opening says: "Engineering estimates — which can vary due to factors such as weather, store operations and systems performance — indicate that the store will use 200,000 kilowatt hours per year of electricity while generating 220,000 kilowatt hours per year."

      The store "will include geothermal technology, 800 solar panels, two wind turbines, LED lighting and low-energy food refrigeration."

      Perhaps your source was referring to the solar panels alone?

      But obviously, nobody will know for sure until it's been in operation for a while.

      — Bill

  2. Could Be

    Bill,

    It is possible he was only talking about solar panels. I don't know. The person I talked with said he was an engineer from Walgreens who was on site inspecting the project. His point was that they really didn't know how well this would succeed because everything is based on unpredictable factors, the weather. If it doesn't work out they have the local power company to come to the rescue.

     

Leave a comment
The goal of our comment policy is to make the comments section a vibrant yet civil space. Treat each other with respect — even the people you disagree with. Whenever possible, provide links to credible documentary evidence to back up your factual claims.

Your email address will not be published.