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Study: Typical police department cut 7 percent

As Evanston officials try to close a $3.5 million budget gap, National Public Radio is reporting on a study by the Police Executive Research Forum that says the average budget cut this year among 600 departments surveyed was seven percent.

As Evanston officials try to close a $3.5 million budget gap, National Public Radio is reporting on a study by the Police Executive Research Forum that says the average budget cut this year among 600 departments surveyed was seven percent.

Chuck Wexler, the executive director of the group, told NPR that dramatic decreases in crime rates across the country in recent years has largely been the result of smarter policing techniques rather than increasing the number of officers on the street.

But he voiced concern about the impact of possible future layoffs on crime rates.

He suggested that compromises on pay and pension benefits by police unions may be needed, as well as some reductions in the type of calls police respond to. He suggested, as an example, that some departments may ask people involved in traffic accidents where there were no injuries to file a report at the police station, rather than having an officer respond to the accident scene.

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