Forty-seven administrators at public school districts in Evanston have a base salary over $100,000.

That’s one of the tidbits of information in newly released reports from the districts mandated under a state law passed earlier this year.

At the top of the pay heap, as you’d expect, are the two superintendents.

Hardy Murphy at District 65 makes $261,330 in salary, pension contributions and a housing allowance, plus a 15 percent contribution to a retirement annuity that wasn’t assigned a dollar value.

Eric Witherspoon at Evanston Township High School District 202 makes $242,954 in salary and pension contributions plus a 20 percent contribution to a retirement annuity.

Links to the full reports, after the jump.

Forty-seven administrators at public school districts in Evanston have a base salary over $100,000.

That’s one of the tidbits of information in newly released reports from the districts mandated under a state law passed earlier this year.

At the top of the pay heap, as you’d expect, are the two superintendents.

Hardy Murphy at District 65 makes $261,330 in salary, pension contributions and a housing allowance, plus a 15 percent contribution to a retirement annuity that wasn’t assigned a dollar value.

Eric Witherspoon at Evanston Township High School District 202 makes $242,954 in salary and pension contributions plus a 20 percent contribution to a retirement annuity.

The reports show no one other than the superintendents got those annuity payments on top of the regular contributions to the state teachers retirement system pension plan.

At District 65 most principals make around $136,593 — including base salary, retirement system contributions and a small stipend.

Five other administrators, including two assistant superintendents, the human resources director, literacy director and chief financial officer, make slightly more than the principals.

At ETHS there’s more differentiation in salary levels, with a few top assistants to the superintendent earning total compensation between $160,000 and $200,000 and department chairs making between $130,000 and $150,000.

Related links

District 65 Administrator Compensation Report

ETHS Administrator Compensation Report

Bill Smith is the editor and publisher of Evanston Now.

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4 Comments

  1. What school administrators make
    The Board must believe that the administers are accomplishing miracles and so deserves these extreme salaries and benefits. Unfortunately for Evanston’s finances, Evanston taxpayers and the education of students this is not true. You just have to look at the total results.
    The positive results [well educated students who are prepared to face the world] are accomplished, whether in Evanston, Wilmette, Chicago or anywhere, by parents who are concerned about their children’s education. Who take time to help them with their studies; maybe set aside their own time to do their own ‘studies’ while their children study; further their own education; show the children the value of education [success, role models, etc.]; provide books, trips to museums, art gallaries, etc. [as much as financially possible]; show how education and learning [sometimes different] can be enjoyable ; shut off the TV and give the children motivation to study instead; attend school meeting and ask the “hard” questions; etc..
    With that support good teachers, not place holders, can take that desire to the next step. But without parents support it can be difficult. While you can give examples of students who defy all odds [un-caring parents, poverty, having to work to support the family and their own school expenses, etc.] occur, they are probably rare enough to not try to pattern a system. There are not enough Jaime Escalantes [of the movie “Stand and Deliver”] in the schools to overcome the lack of family involvement.
    A large bureaucracy and very salaries/benefits esp. for administrators, will not accomplish these goals. They are bureaucrats and not, despite what they want everyone to believe, educators. We could probably get just as qualified people for 1/3 the price—people who are motivated by the job not the money. Who to get, I’d certainly be more impressed with someone Michelle Rhee gave her imprimatur.

  2. Motivated educrats
    “We could probably get just as qualified people for 1/3 the price—people who are motivated by the job not the money”

    I doubt it. I’m not a fan of the education bureaucracy, but I can’t imagine why anyone would want to do those jobs. Dealing with all of the petty school board politics is no picnic. I have read the emotional messages that parents have posted over issues like what time school will start, honors geometry classes, or what is being served in the school cafeteria (I suggest pancakes) – and then there are issues like school safety and budgets. Who wants to put up with all that? They deserve to be paid well, just like plumbers get paid a lot – because their work is hard and they put up with a lot of crap and I wouldn’t want to do it.

    I think that most people who care about education would prefer to keep teaching instead of becoming administrators and dealing with all of that nonsense.

  3. Do the math
    Quick multiplication (47*$100K*1.2 to conservatively allow for those who make more than 100K per year) yields $5,640,000 in salaries, not including benefits or employment taxes.

    It’s a lot of money, before the districts even hire teachers or open the buildings.

    Or maybe not?

    How does this compare to other suburbs?

    To other similarly sized enterprises?

    Is this too many administrators for 10 or 11 thousand students?

    Is this too much per administrator?

    Most lawyers and MBAs who have jobs make more than 100K per year.

    1. Salaries of Educators
      But MBAs and lawyers have “real” degrees. Education degrees are about on the same level as music degrees. How many of the teachers [at least in 8-12th grades] have their M.S. or M.A. [or better] in their field, from a department with a PhD program, at same level as students who will do their PhD [i.e. not a “teachers” degree in the subject] and teach in their field ?
      As for all the hours they put in, a lawyer, accountant or others wanting to get ahead will spend up to 80 hours a week. In most areas you have to spend 70+ hours a week [including the 9-5] to keep up and progress in your field.
      Do the administrators spend ANY extra time outside of their 9-5 days—not even as much as the teachers.

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