Strawberry refrigerator cakeEvanston freelance writer Monica Rogers says she’s launched her new Lost Recipes Found website.

Rogers, who freelances for the Chicago Tribune and on occasion for Evanston Now, has built her interest in favorite recipes from restaurants that have gone out of business, and in other food favorites from the past, into the new website.

Fridge cakes from the ’40s, recipes from restaurants that closed long ago, old-fashioned sweets and stews, everybody’s got a “lost” recipe they truly miss, Rogers says, and her site seeks to help find and revive the best of them.

“Before posting reader-requested finds to the site, I test, photograph and write about them,” she says. “Some recipes are down-home easy, others more gourmet.”

She also includes a section called, “Better Left Lost” a cache of dubious dishes like Corned Beef Gelatin salad.

She plans to add more features, from from recipes chefs miss most to vintage cocktails, as the site grows.

Bill Smith is the editor and publisher of Evanston Now.

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3 Comments

  1. Family Favorites Made to Order
    I’ve often thought a great business would be to take an old favorite from our youth that we or a spouse can’t make [lack of skill] and can’t convince anyone else to make, and to be able to take the receipe to a store and get it made. Then if the baker likes it, give us a discount on the price of the preparation.
    Cefts and others I’ve mentioned this to, said “no way” would anyone take the gamble that “it would not taste like we remember mom making it.”
    Oh well, we can all remember how good it was back then !

  2. Milk shakes made with ice milk
    When I had my very first job we made real milkshakes using frozen ice milk, milk and then real flavorings like Hersey’s chocolate syrup or a real diced banana. The shake was creamy, frosty, lower calorie than using ice cream and with a more intense flavor. I’d love to have one of those again, but when I mention ice milk people look at me like I’m nuts. Maybe it’s a West Coast thing.

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