The Illinois House has approved and sent to Gov. Quinn a Senate bill that will require apartment leases to include a warning to tenants that criminal activity could get them evicted.

By Diane Lee

The Illinois House has approved and sent to Gov. Quinn a Senate bill that will require apartment leases to include a warning to tenants that criminal activity could get them evicted.

The measure, sponsored by State Rep. Anthony Deluca, D-Chicago Heights, covers any criminal activity classified as felony or class D misdemeanor.

“The intent of this is to create an environment for people living in rental properties, a safe and comfortable environment,” Deluca said.

But some lawmakers expressed concern that if one person in a family is abusive, then everyone in the family would be punished.

State Rep. Lou Lang, D-Skokie, said it would make it easier for landlords to evict a tenant who is only charged with a crime and not convicted.

“I like supporting landlords who are trying to stop really nasty things going on in their premises, but I also believe in due process,” Lang said. “I’m not sure this bill provides appropriate due process.”

State Rep. Sidney Mathias, R-Buffalo Grove, said the proposal only notifies tenants of the existing law that their lease can be terminated or they can be evicted if they engage in criminal activity.

“It actually protects the tenant more by telling them what can happen,” he said. “It doesn’t change any of their rights, and it doesn’t change any rights of the landlord to do what he can do even if this law does not pass.”

The House voted 65-50 to send Senate Bill 1766 to the governor.

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1 Comment

  1. Notification of Eviction

    Again, Evanston was a leader as our Landlord-Tenant Residential Ordinance and Model Lease Agreement were amended many years ago to give landlords the opportunity to evict tenants who are involved in illegal activity. 

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